Saturday, 18 July 2015

Time for a little break



With the welcoming of Tia and the new routines this bundle of joy is giving us, along with the onslaught of a draining summer (I have S.A.D syndrome - Summer Absolute Dislike), I feel it is time for a blogging break along with a little revamp of my pages here.  I do love to change things around and have a little tidy up, don't you?  So for next few weeks I'll be recharging the batteries and looking forward to sitting under my pergola with the nights drawing in and the cooler evenings to come.


I will still be going on my little trips, including the real Downtown Abbey (Highclere Castle) in a couple of weeks, but I want time to write posts more leisurely and with more feeling.  I have been a little rushed of late which explains my absence from visiting you, comments and writing.  Summer is full of cheerful happy faces, but this eludes me.


I am drained and in a season that I never enjoy, do you get like that?  Maybe I should live in Australia or New Zealand for the Northern Hemisphere's summer months!  How I envy you at the moment.  Reading through past posts of this time of year, I have surprised myself at how much this season saps my energy and any inspiration.


It is a temporary glitch I assure you, and one that usually lifts as soon as the nights draw in to about 8 in the evening and the temperature drops to give a nice steam cloud when breathing outside.
Mojo, I know you are there somewhere but I don't want to play hide and seek for the time being!  So I will plod along with the walks in the Fens...


... and enjoy the Lincolnshire skies (or any other skies I come across!).


The summer bridge that I have to cross will be achievable soon and then I will have an autumn spring in my step.  (Sorry to those of you who love summer).


Enjoy your summer and the testing time of busy school summer holidays.  Have lots of fun and enjoy every moment.


I will leave you with news of Tia.   Our Tia now has her own Facebook page (here) which keeps her rescuers and people that are just wanting to follow along with her new journey updated.  She is coming along in leaps and bounds, so please follow her along and show your support for this precious little dog.  Maybe even post photos of your own fur babies.  All are welcome - it's just a bit of fun.


 Until next time, have a wonderful summer and I will see you again when the bugs have died down and I can sit in the garden and breathe again!!

HAPPY SUMMER



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Friday, 10 July 2015

So, Where Shall We Go On Our Journey Today - Bletchley Park (Part Two)

Thank you so much for visiting last week for part one of our tour of Bletchley Park. Now, are you ready for part 2?  


Back outside and the gardens were beautiful to walk around on a very warm day, along with just sitting by the lake, but we loved to see the other areas that were occupied during this secret time.  Dilly Knox, Mavis Batey and Alan Turing were just three of its residents.


This little garden looked so quaint, especially with the collection of logs ready for the winter months.



Then into one of the huts.  So plain but interesting to see where all the work took place.


The long single corridor with doors off to either side.  


Simple, blacked out, just desks and office paraphernalia occupying the space.  There were sounds of people working so you felt a little like you had an invisible cloak on and were listening to people’s conversations without being noticed.


Codes waiting to be deciphered from one room to the next.  The anxiety of the people working here must have been incredibly high.


From one hut to another, each one having a purpose.  We loved this room with its exhibits of pigeon carriers.  Another vital thing during the War.



And then a plain room, dark, with two desks and a little cupboard for personal items. 


This is where one of the great people during the War worked.  Nothing was said about what he did for decades, while this man tried to live his life as he wanted to.  Without him and his team, the war would have rumbled on killing many more lives.  And yet, here is where he worked.  A mind totally full of goodness knows.


In one of the main block stands a tribute to him.  Such artistry with slate, incredibly inspiring just like him.



On the wall is hung the apology from Gordon Brown who was the Prime Minister in 2009.  It is incredibly sad that Turing took his own life from cyanide poisoning after being chemically castrated for his homosexuality.  A different era and so punishing and unforgiving.


Amongst the exhibition, is Turings’ teddy bear.


And his watch.


It seemed only right to see his machine – the Turing Bombe.  This is a reconstruction as these machines were dismantled after the War to protect the secrecy behind them and the code breakers.  A lady gave a verbal and visual demonstration and I could give you a run down however, I didn’t understand a single word!  Basically the German Enigma machines gave the code breakers a headache by them trying to figure out what the solution was from a code which would give a possibility of 26x26x26 different codes.  The Turing Bombe narrowed this to about 624 different codes which would then go to the code breakers who had a limited amount of time to crack them (I think I’ve got this right!).


Unfortunately one of the problems was to work out which targets would be allowed through and which wouldn’t.  This was to make sure the Germans didn’t deduce the fact that their codes were being solved.


The invasion of the Normandy beaches were possible due to this machine as the British sent a code to say they were invading Calais with the hope that the Germans would pick this up.  With the Turing Bombe, they were able to decipher a code coming back from Germany to confirm they had taken the bait, Britain and the allied forces then invaded Normandy and worked their way through and cut the War’s life at least by a couple of years.


To think that this enormous working machine can now fit on a microchip is beyond mind blowing.

And there we have it.  After an £8m restoration, Bletchley Park can at last reveal its secrets, its personal stories with diaries donated and code papers unearthed. 


It was fascinating to learn about the lives that helped with the victory of War, and the sadness of life afterwards.

It was also lovely to see things that are still a recognisable sight and well, just home!


Thanks for coming along with us on this mammoth tour!

Have a wonderful weekend and week ahead.



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